News & Updates - Center for Changing Our Campus Culture

News & Updates

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This Assessment Tool is intended to be used after reviewing Integrating Victim Services into Conduct Policies Guide. This case study can be used to assess how integrated victim services is in your institutions’ current domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking (DVSAS) conduct policy. “Se pretende utilizar esta Herramienta de Evaluación tras revisar la Guía de Políticas de Conducta sobre su Integración en los Servicios a la Víctima. Este caso de estudio puede ser utilizado para evaluar el nivel de integración de su institución, los servicios a la víctima y la política de conducta existente sobre la Violencia doméstica, Violencia en la relación de pareja, acoso sexual y acecho (DVSAS).” Download Document descargar documento

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The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights today issued a Notice of Interpretation explaining that it will enforce Title IX’s prohibition on discrimination on the basis of sex to include: (1) discrimination based on sexual orientation; and (2) discrimination based on gender identity. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any education program or activity offered by a recipient of federal financial assistance. The Department’s interpretation stems from the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, issued one year ago this week, in which the Supreme Court recognized that it is impossible to discriminate against a person based on their sexual orientation or gender identity without discriminating against that person based on sex. “The Supreme Court has upheld the right for LGBTQ+ people to live and work without fear of harassment, exclusion, and discrimination – and our LGBTQ+ students have the same rights and deserve the same protections. I’m proud to have directed the Office for Civil Rights to enforce Title IX to protect all students from all forms of sex discrimination,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. “Today, the Department makes clear that all […]

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Most men think of sexual assault as coercion through physical force—the overly dramatized image of an assailant jumping out of the bushes or lurking in the shadows. That does happen, and those are very clear cases of sexual assault.

However, sexual assault shows up in myriad other ways on college campuses, and yet, far too often men are not forced to reconcile our actions with their consequences when they cause harm. 

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It all comes down to this: law enforcement and school administrators have to protect survivors—on campus and online.

Moving forward, college campuses must take more effective preventative measures to prevent sexual assault on campus, including increasing security presence, bringing awareness to the incidents of sexual misconduct on campus, and delivering harsher penalties for offenders.

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As we endeavor to educate college campuses and communities about sexual assault during National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, it is essential to understand the subtle way dangerous relationships can lead to sex trafficking.

College campuses can be ground zero for fighting sexual assault and human trafficking. Leaders on campuses should provide students, faculty, staff, parents, and communities with information to recognize the warning signs of destructive relationships.

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